Being right doesn’t mean you can be an arsehole – Dinomisina

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I was doing some thinking the other day, and I remembered that Matrix quote about humans being a virus. I thought, hey that’d be some cold shit say in relation to the pandemic. Here’s the one I’m on about…

Every mammal on this planet instinctively develops a natural equilibrium with the surrounding environment but you humans do not. You move to an area and you multiply and multiply until every natural resource is consumed and the only way you can survive is to spread to another area. There is another organism on this planet that follows the same pattern. Do you know what it is? A virus. Human beings are a disease, a cancer of this planet. You’re a plague and we are the cure. – Agent Smith

Well, I mean he’s right. Humans as a species suck. We destroy everything we touch, and we’re so far removed from our original habitats that our reckless consumption has little to no moral impact on us. We are the Earth’s virus.

That does NOT mean it is okay to say something like, we deserve this. Which is what I was going to say. The support for such a statement is shown above therefore it would be well founded, but that still doesn’t make it okay, and I shouldn’t have to explain why.

“I just thought it was some cold-blooded shit to say to a motherfucker before I popped a cap in his ass” – Jules, Pulp Fiction

There’s meant to be a thing in psychology that prevents the publishing of research that could have negative implications for the demographic it studies, even if the work is correct.

This is because facts and figures don’t exist in isolation, just like everything else on this planet… well, except for you and I at the moment. When taken out of context, you can use facts wherever you like, however ridiculous. You could suggest during a press conference injecting ourselves with disinfectant, because look at how well that’s worked on the virus so far!

In Pulp Fiction, Tarantino beautifully embellishes a Bible verse to create a fierce speech, which Jules would recite to somebody before he popped a cap in their ass. Jules pays no mind to the meaning behind the text, but after an act of God changes his perspective, he finds in new meaning.

Ezekiel 25:17. The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the iniquities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men.
Blessed is he who, in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother’s keeper and the finder of lost children.
And I will strike down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger those who attempt to poison and destroy my brothers. And you will know my name is the Lord when I lay my vengeance upon thee.
– Jules Winnfield

When faced with a choice, Jules spares a man, Ringo, and his girlfriend who are holding up a diner at gunpoint. He relinquishes his ways as the evil tyranny of men, and assumes his new role in the world as shepherd, guiding Ringo and his girl (the weak) through the valley of darkness.

The world is confronted with a similar choice today. A drastic change in circumstances, which some may consider an act of God, has meant a rethinking of the way we approach situations is required.

Do we continue in our role as the evil man, continuing to carelessly consume and destroy? Or do we adapt, and embrace our new role as shepherd, and guide the weak through the valley of darkness?

I much prefer to use this quote in relation to the pandemic 🙂

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